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How to Advance Your Job Search

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binocularsguyUnderstand the NEW Job Market

Research shows that if you are introduced to the hiring decision maker through a mutual contact your odds of securing an interview and ultimately a job offer improve by over 80%.

 

Although developing a resume and cover letter are essential for a successful job search, the days of only submitting them via corporate sites and job boards is over.  Social networks are now an integral part of an effective job search.

“Spend 10% of your time applying for jobs and 90% of your time connecting with your network”

 

Spend 10% of your time applying for jobs and 90% of your time connecting with your network – either through social networking or in-person networking.

 

Sharpen your Personal Brand

Jobs are scarce and candidates are plentiful. Avoid the pitfall of brand vagueness by re-evaluating your personal branding; this comprises your entire career image.  Start by differentiating yourself from the stack with a resume, cover letter and LinkedIn profile that expresses your value, knowledge, skills and accomplishments. Then perfect your job search elevator pitch. To learn more: http://www.forbes.com/sites/susanadams/2012/03/29/how-to-craft-a-job-search-elevator-pitch-2/

“Perfect your job search elevator pitch”

 

Take into consideration your clothing and appearance.  Does it support the culture of the industry, company and/or position you are targeting?  Remember, the gateway to many of your opportunities is found within your personal contacts that you see locally.  When  you are out-and-about, put your best foot forward!

 

Get up to Date

More and more companies are asking newsworthy interview questions to test applicants about their global awareness. As the world becomes more interconnected companies are looking for individuals who are up-to-date on current affairs with a strong general knowledge base. Keep up with news and trends.

 

In closing, job searching isn’t easy but if you are looking for career advancement it is inevitable.  Get back in the hunt, you may just find the opportunity of a lifetime.

 

by:  Marilyn Maslin @ Resume Footprint